Robin Flower The Western Island or the Great Blasket With Illustrations by Ida M Flower First Edition 1945

$450.00

The Great Blasket Island has been called by its inhabitants “the last parish to America.” Three miles out in the Atlantic west of County Kerry, at the time Robin Flower published this book, its 150 inhabitants were entirely Irish-speaking. A preserved environment where the “old folk fashion” preserved not only language but also customs, folk-lore and folk-song. While cataloging the Irish manuscripts at the British Museum, Robin Flower spent long periods of time on the island. In both verse and prose, he tells the stories of these people and their ways, their folk-tales, their ghosts and fairies, poets, and of the destruction of the galleons of the Spanish Armada on their coast. One of the storytellers singled out by Robin Flower was Tomas O’Crohan (Tomás ó Crithin), whose wit and warmth of character make him emerge from these pages as an out-standing personality of Irish literature.

Description

Flower, Robin. The Western Island or the Great Blasket. With Illustrations by Ida M. Flower. Oxford University Press, New York, 1945. First edition, 20.5 cm, [1 blank; vi; table of contents, verso has a list of illustration and maps; 138 pages; 1 blank] Bound in green cloth stamped with a compass dial on the front cover and black lettering on the spine. The front endpaper is a map of the Great Blasket. The back endpaper is a map of Dingle Bay. The dust jacket is also green, with the original price of $2.50 unclipped and advertisements for other books from Oxford University Press on the back panel. The spine of the dust jacket is sunned, with slight wear across the top. The book’s condition is fine.

The Great Blasket Island has been called by its inhabitants “the last parish to America.” Three miles out in the Atlantic west of County Kerry, at the time Robin Flower published this book, its 150 inhabitants were entirely Irish-speaking. A preserved environment where the “old folk fashion” preserved not only language but also customs, folk-lore and folk-song. While cataloging the Irish manuscripts at the British Museum, Robin Flower spent long periods of time on the island. In both verse and prose, he tells the stories of these people and their ways, their folk-tales, their ghosts and fairies, poets, and of the destruction of the galleons of the Spanish Armada on their coast. One of the storytellers singled out by Robin Flower was Tomas O’Crohan (Tomás ó Crithin), whose wit and warmth of character make him emerge from these pages as an out-standing personality of Irish literature.

SIMON FRASER Signed Copy of The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and The Isles Communicated in an Original Pleasing & Familiar Style Having the Lively Airs Introduced as Medleys to Form a Sequence to Each Slower Movement With an Admired Plain Harmony for the Piano Forte Harp Organ or Violoncello Intended rather to preserve Simplicity than load with Embellishments Edited by Capt S Fraser Chiefly acquired during the Interesting Period from 1715 to 1745 through the Authentic Source narrated in the Accompanying Prospectus

Robert Douglas THE PEERAGE OF SCOTLAND 1764 Signed by Sir John Halkett and Elizabeth GC Menzies with the Bookplate of Pitfirrane Castle