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Napoleonic Era Album of 91 Signed Portraits of Major Personalities Mostly in France

$7,500.00

An album of engraved portraits of prominent French men and women from the First Empire through Charles X, of which 91 are signed by the subjects under their lithographed likenesses. A hard-bound book, now rebound in maroon cloth, and now housed in a matching box, 11 ¾ in x 8 ¼ in. The original covers were detached. The book was originally bound in pebble-grained maroon paper boards with an eighth morocco back-strip, now perished. The original boards are preserved in the custom-made box. The original front cover still has the bookplate of Charles A. Welch, decorated with a horned animal device above a shield of six stars.

Description

An album of engraved portraits of prominent mostly French men and women from the First Empire through Charles X, of which 91 are signed by the subjects under their lithographed likenesses. A hard-bound book, now rebound in maroon cloth, and now housed in a matching box, 11 ¾ in x 8 ¼ in. The original covers were detached. The book was originally bound in pebble-grained maroon paper boards with an eighth morocco back-strip, now perished. The original boards are preserved in the custom-made box. The original front cover still has the bookplate of Charles A. Welch, decorated with a horned animal device above a shield of six stars.

Collation is of 102 individual lithographed portraits sewn together. Traces of multiple penciled page annotations by previous owners are present in several of the lower right-hand corners of the recto, as printing and manuscript material occurs only on the recto, as is expected for a collection of lithographed portraits. All sheets have been trimmed by previous owners. Bracketed page numbers in pencil are those of the present owner, 102 pages are counted, starting with page 3, as the unorthodox previous binding is believed to have counted two initial blanks. Eleven portraits are unsigned. Seventeen sitters are unidentified. There are two custom stamps of authentication and a signature preceded by: « Vu et apprové Paris [19 Set[emb]re 18[30] Le Chef de la Libraire [Maz ?] nj m » on pages 23 and 102. The list of names, unsigned portraits are noted, immediately below, a partial index by profession.

S.M. Charles X. Roi de France. Charles X (Charles Philippe; 9 October 1757 – 6 November 1836) was King of France from 16 September 1824 until 2 August 1830. Signed as “Charles.”

Josephine, Napoleon Bonaparte’s first wife, Empress of France.

Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de La Pagerie; Signed as “Lapagerie Bonaparte.” (23 June 1763 – 29 May 1814) was the first wife of Napoleon and the first Empress of the French after he proclaimed himself Emperor.

Artists, Art & Architecture :
Antoine-Denis Chaudet (3 March 1763 – 18 April 1810) was a French sculptor who worked in a neoclassical style.

Paul Delaroche (17 July 1797 – 4 November 1856) was a French painter who achieved his greater successes painting historical scenes.

Mme Dufrenoy née Billet, sig as such; Adélaïde-Gillette Dufrénoy (née Billet) (1765–1825) was a French poet and painter from Brittany.

Antoine Charles Horace Vernet aka. Carle Vernet (14 August 1758 – 17 November 1836) was a French painter.

Clergy:
François-Jean-Hyacinthe Feutrier, comte-évêque de Beauvais, né à Paris le 2 avril 1785, mort le 27 juin 1830. Il brilla comme prédicateur, devint successivement vicaire de la grande aumônerie, curé de la Madeleine, vicaire général du diocèse de Paris (1823), et enfin évêque de Beauvais (1826).

Jean-Baptiste Henri-Dominique Lacordaire (12 May 1802 – 21 November 1861), often styled Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, was a French ecclesiastic, preacher, journalist, theologian and political activist.

Johann Kaspar (or Caspar) Lavater (15 November 1741 – 2 January 1801) was a Swiss poet, writer, philosopher, physiognomist and theologian. In 1769 Lavater took Holy Orders in Zurich’s Zwinglian Church, and officiated until his death as deacon or pastor in churches in his native city.

N.S.P Le Pape Pie IX Pope Pius IX (Italian: Pio IX), born Giovanni Maria Mastai Ferretti; 13 May 1792 – 7 February 1878) was head of the Catholic Church from 16 June 1846 to his death on 7 February 1878. He was the longest-reigning elected pope, serving for over 31 years. During his pontificate, Pius IX convened the First Vatican Council (1869–70), which decreed papal infallibility, but the council was cut short owing to the loss of the Papal States.

L’Abbé Licard signed as, “L’Abbé Licard.” Unidentified sitter

Henri Jean-Baptiste Grégoire, également appelé l’abbé Grégoire, né le 4 décembre 1750 à Vého (Trois-Évêchés, aujourd’hui dans le département de Meurthe-et-Moselle) et mort le 28 mai 18311 à Paris, est un prêtre catholique, évêque constitutionnel et homme politique français, l’une des principales figures de la Révolution française.

Historians:
Aimable Guillaume Prosper Brugière, baron de Barante (June 10, 1782 – November 22, 1866) was a French statesman and historian.

Pierre Claude François Daunou 18 August 1761 – 20 June 1840) was a French statesman of the French Revolution and Empire. An author and historian, he served as the nation’s archivist under both the Empire and the Restoration.
Jean-François Marmontel (11 July 1723 – 31 December 1799) was a French historian and writer, a member of the Encyclopédistes movement.

Jules Michelet 21 August 1798 – 9 February 1874) was a French historian. He was born in Paris to a family with Huguenot traditions.

Politicians, Prosecutors, Secretaries & Government Ministers:
Félix Barthe (28 July 1795 – 28 February 1863) was a French lawyer, Deputy, Minister of Public Education and then Minister of Justice. He was the first President of the Court of Accounts (1834–37, 1839–63) and became a Senator of the Second French Empire.

Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac (10 September 1755 – 13 January 1841) was a French politician, freemason, journalist, and one of the most prominent members of the National Convention during the French Revolution.

Adolphe Augustin Marie Billault (12 November 1805 – 13 October 1863) was a French lawyer and politician who played a leading role in the governments of Napoleon III.

Jean-Baptiste Bessières, 1st Duc d’ Istria (6 August 1768 – 1 May 1813) was a Marshal of the Empire of the Napoleonic Era.

Thomas Robert Bugeaud, marquis de la Piconnerie, duc d’Isly (15 October 1784 – 10 June 1849) was a Marshal of France and Governor-General of Algeria.

Laurent Cunin-Gridaine (10 July 1778 – 19 April 1859) was a French businessman and politician. He was a deputy from 1827 to 1848, and Minister of Agriculture and Commerce from 1839 to 1848, with one short interruption.

Laurent Cunin-Gridaine Laurent Cunin-Gridaine (10 July 1778 – 19 April 1859) was a French businessman and politician. He was a deputy from 1827 to 1848, and Minister of Agriculture and Commerce from 1839 to 1848
Edmond Louis Alexis Dubois-Crancé (14 October 1747 – 28 June 1814) was a French soldier and politician.

Jules Armand Stanislas Dufaure. In ink, signed as “J Dufaure.” (4) December 1798 – 28 June 1881) was a French statesman.

Pierre Claude François Daunou 18 August 1761 – 20 June 1840) was a French statesman of the French Revolution and Empire. An author and historian, he served as the nation’s archivist under both the Empire and the Restoration.
Baron Pierre Charles François Dupin, signed as « Baron Charles Dupin. » (6 October 1784, Varzy, Nièvre – 18 January 1873, Paris, France) was a French Catholic mathematician, engineer, economist and politician, particularly known for work in the field of mathematics, where the Dupin cyclide and Dupin indicatrix are named after him; and for his work in the field of statistical and thematic mapping. In 1826, he created the earliest known choropleth map.

Armand Gensonné (10 August 1758 – 31 October 1793) was a French politician.

Louis-Étienne François Héricart-Ferrand, vicomte de Thury, (Paris, 3 June 1776 – Rome, 15 January 1854) was a French politician and man of science.

Jacques Laffitte (24 October 1767 – 26 May 1844) was a leading French banker, governor of the Bank of France (1814–1820) and liberal member of the Chamber of Deputies during the Bourbon Restoration and July Monarchy.

Claude François Méneval, Bonaparte’s private secretary. As Joseph Bonaparte’s secretary, Méneval was present at the negotiations leading to the signing of the Treaty of Mortefontaine between France and the United States (3 October, 1800), the Treaty of Lunéville between France and Austria (3 February, 1801), the Concordat (15 July, 1801) and the Treaty of Amiens between France and Britain (27 March, 1802).

Antoine Quentin Fouquier de Tinville (10 June 1746 – 7 May 1795) was a French prosecutor during the Revolution and Reign of Terror periods.

“Tronchet.” Born in Paris, he became an avocat at the Parlement de Paris, and gained a great reputation in a consultative capacity. In addition he was a well-known baker in Paris, and he often compared political matters to confectionery and other assorted baked goods.

Marie Jean Hérault de Séchelles, portrait by Jean-Louis Laneuville. Marie-Jean Hérault de Séchelles (20 September 1759 – 5 April 1794) was a French judge and politician who took part in the French Revolution.

Musicians :
Adam, Adolphe, Composer 1803-1856

Jacques-François-Fromental-Élie Halévy, usually known as Fromental Halévy 27 May 1799 – 17 March 1862), was a French composer. He is known today largely for his opera La Juive.

Gaspare Luigi Pacifico Spontini (14 November 1774 – 24 January 1851) was an Italian opera composer and conductor.

Nicolas-Marie d’Alayrac. Baptised 13 June 1753 – 26 November 1809), nicknamed the Musician poet, more commonly Nicolas Dalayrac, was a French composer of the Classical period.

Military & Diplomatic:
Andréossy, Antoine François 1761 – 1828, Count, general and ambassador to Britain.

François Claude Amour, marquis de Bouillé (19 November 1739 – 14 November 1800) was a French general. He died in exile in London, and is mentioned as a hated Royalist in the French national anthem, La Marseillaise.

Achille Léonce Victor Charles, 3rd Duke of Broglie, Sig. “V. Broglie.” 1785 – 25 January 1870), fully Victor de Broglie,[ was a French peer, statesman, and diplomat. He was the third duke of Broglie and served as president of the Council during the July Monarchy, from August 1830 to November 1830 and from March 1835 to February 1836.

Thomas Robert Bugeaud, marquis de la Piconnerie, duc d’Isly (15 October 1784 – 10 June 1849) was a Marshal of France and Governor-General of Algeria.

Joseph Claude Marie Charbonnel, né le 24 mars 1775 à Dijon, mort le 10 mars 1846 à Paris), Comte de Salès et de l’Empire, est un général français de la Révolution et de l’Empire.

Jean-Baptiste Bessières, 1st Duc d’ Istria (6 August 1768 – 1 May 1813) was a Marshal of the Empire of the Napoleonic Era.

Edmond Louis Alexis Dubois-Crancé (14 October 1747 – 28 June 1814) was a French soldier and politician.
Maurice-Joseph-Louis Gigost d’Elbée 21 March 1752 – 6 January 1794) was a French Royalist military leader.
Gaspard, Baron Gourgaud (September 14, 1783 – July 25, 1852), also known simply as Gaspard Gourgaud, was a French soldier, prominent in the Napoleonic wars.

[No Signature] L’ Admiral Grimouard Nicolas Henri René, comte de Grimouard1, dit le « chevalier de Grimouard », né vers 1738 à L’Houmée2 ou le 25 janvier 1743 à Fontenay-le-Comte et guillotiné le 7 février 1794 à Rochefort, est un officier de marine français du XVIIIe siècle. Grimouard se distingue à plusieurs reprises pendant la guerre d’indépendance des États-Unis. Il commande la frégate La Minerve lorsque cette dernière est capturée par les vaisseaux de 74 canons Courageux (1753) et Valiant en 1781. Grimouard est blessé et fait prisonnier, avant d’être échangé et de rentrer en France peu de temps après. Il est un des rédacteurs de la constitution Américaine. Il participe à la capture de Tobago et à celle de la Grenade sous les ordres du comte de Grasse.

Emmanuel de Grouchy, 2nd Marquis de Grouchy 23 October 1766 – 29 May 1847) was a French general and Marshal of the Empire.

Armand Charles, Count Guilleminot (March 2, 1774 – March 14, 1840), was a French general during the Napoleonic wars.

Armand Samuel de Marescot, né à Tours le 1er mars 1758, mort le 5 novembre 1832 au château de Chaslay, près de Montoire (Loir-et-Cher), est un général français de la Révolution et de l’Empire.

Armand Samuel de Marescot, né à Tours le 1er mars 1758, mort le 5 novembre 1832 au château de Chaslay, près de Montoire (Loir-et-Cher), est un général français de la Révolution et de l’Empire. Il meurt à Montoire le 5 novembre 1832, à l’âge de 74 ans. Son nom figure sur le côté Est de l’Arc de Triomphe.

Charles Antoine Louis Alexis Morand (4 June 1771, Pontarlier or Montbenoit, Doubs – 1835) Comte de l’Empire, was a general of the French army during the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars. He fought at many of the most important battles of the time, including Austerlitz, Borodino and Waterloo.

Michel Ordener was a general of division and a commander in Napoleon’s elite Imperial Guard. Of plebeian origins, he was born 2 September 1755 in L’Hôpital and enlisted as private at the age of 18 years in the Prince Conde’s Legion. He was promoted through the ranks; as warrant officer of a regiment of Chasseurs à Cheval, he embraced the French Revolution in 1789. He advanced quickly through the officer ranks during the French Revolutionary Wars.

General Claude Pierre Pajol. Claude-Pierre, Comte de Pajol (3 February 1772 – 20 March 1844), was a French cavalry general and military commander during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and political figure.

Charles-François du Périer Dumouriez (26 January 1739 – 14 March 1823) was a French general during the French Revolutionary Wars. He shared the victory at Valmy with General François Christophe Kellermann, but later deserted the Revolutionary Army, and became a royalist intriguer during the reign of Napoleon as well as an adviser to the British government. Dumouriez is one of the names inscribed under the Arc de Triomphe, on Column 3.
La Rochejaquelein, Henri-Auguste-Georges du Vergier Marquis de. Henri du Vergier, comte de la Rochejaquelein (30 August 1772 – 28 January 1794) was the youngest general of the Royalist Vendéan insurrection during the French Revolution.

Jean Paul Adam, comte de Schramm (1 December 1789 in Arras – 25 February 1884) was a French Minister of War. Schramm’s is one of the names inscribed under the Arc de Triomphe.

Jean-Nicolas Stofflet (3 February 1753 – 25 February 1796) was a French leader of the Revolt in the Vendée against the First French Republic.

Jean-Joseph Ange d’Hautpoul (13 May 1754 – 14 February 1807) was a French cavalry general of the Napoleonic wars. His son, Alexandre Joseph Napoléon, brought his remains to France in 1840 to be buried in the family crypt at the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. D’Hautpoul’s heart is conserved in a vault in Les Invalides, and his name is inscribed on Column 16 of the Arc de Triomphe, among the first 384 names to be inscribed at the Arc.

Scientists, Naturalists & Mathematicians:
Jean Sylvain Bailly (French: [bɑji]; 15 September 1736 – 12 November 1793) was a French astronomer, mathematician, freemason, and political leader of the early part of the French Revolution. He presided over the Tennis Court Oath, served as the mayor of Paris from 1789 to 1791, and was ultimately guillotined during the Reign of Terror.

Pierre Louis Dulong, signed as « Dulong. » 12 February 1785 – 19 July 1838) was a French physicist and chemist. He is remembered today largely for the law of Dulong and Petit, although he was much-lauded by his contemporaries for his studies into the elasticity of steam, conduction of heat, and specific heats of gases.

Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy 21 August 1789 – 23 May 1857) was a French mathematician, engineer, and physicist who made pioneering contributions to several branches of mathematics, including mathematical analysis and continuum mechanics.

Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy 21 August 1789 – 23 May 1857) was a French mathematician, engineer, and physicist who made pioneering contributions to several branches of mathematics, including mathematical analysis and continuum mechanics. He was one of the first to state and rigorously prove theorems of calculus, rejecting the heuristic principle of the generality of algebra of earlier authors. He almost singlehandedly founded complex analysis and the study of permutation groups in abstract algebra.

Baron Pierre Charles François Dupin, signed as « Baron Charles Dupin. » (6 October 1784, Varzy, Nièvre – 18 January 1873, Paris, France) was a French Catholic mathematician, engineer, economist and politician, particularly known for work in the field of mathematics, where the Dupin cyclide and Dupin indicatrix are named after him; and for his work in the field of statistical and thematic mapping. In 1826, he created the earliest known choropleth map.

Marshal Rémi Joseph Isidore Exelmans, 1st Comte Exelmans (13 November 1775 – 22 June 1852) was a distinguished French soldier of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, as well as a political figure of the following period. His name is inscribed on the southern pillar of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

Comte François Louis Joseph Fernig, né en 1735 d’une famille d’Alsace, militaire français, père des Sœurs Fernig.
Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (15 April 1772 – 19 June 1844) was a French naturalist who established the principle of “unity of composition”. He was a colleague of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and expanded and defended Lamarck’s evolutionary theories. Geoffroy’s scientific views had a transcendental flavor (unlike Lamarck’s materialistic views) and were similar to those of German morphologists like Lorenz Oken.

Louis-Étienne François Héricart-Ferrand, vicomte de Thury, (Paris, 3 June 1776 – Rome, 15 January 1854) was a French politician and man of science. He was a mining engineer who produced more than 350 scholarly articles; was a member of numerous societies and professional associations. He was heir to an estate of great horticultural richness with the equivalent of a private arboretum. He was a founding member of the National Horticultural Society of France.

Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier FRS (FOR) HFRSE 11 March 1811 – 23 September 1877) was a French astronomer and mathematician who specialized in celestial mechanics and is best known for predicting the existence and position of Neptune using only mathematics. The calculations were made to explain discrepancies with Uranus’s orbit and the laws of Kepler and Newton. Le Verrier’s name is one of the 72 names inscribed on the Eiffel Tower.

Justus Freiherr von Liebig (12 May 1803 – 18 April 1873) was a German scientist who made major contributions to agricultural and biological chemistry, and was considered the founder of organic chemistry.

Anselme Payen 6 January 1795 – 12 May 1871) was a French chemist known for discovering the enzyme diastase, and the carbohydrate cellulose.

Théophile-Jules Pelouze (also known as Jules Pelouze, Théophile Pelouze, Theo Pelouze, or T. J. Pelouze, pronounced 26 February 1807 – 31 May 1867) was a French chemist. His name is one of the 72 names inscribed on the Eiffel Tower.

Adrien Duport (6 February 1759 – 6 July 1798) was a French politician, and lawyer.

Writers:
Laurent Angliviel de la Beaumelle (28 January 1726 in Valleraugue – 17 November 1773 in Gard) was a French Protestant writer.

Armand Carrel (8 May 1800 – 25 July 1836) was a French journalist and political writer.
Jean-Baptiste du Val-de-Grâce, baron de Cloots (24 June 1755 – 24 March 1794), better known as Anacharsis Cloots (also spelled Clootz), was a Prussian nobleman who was a significant figure in the French Revolution. Perhaps the first to theorize world government, he was also an anarchist. He was nicknamed “orator of mankind”, “citoyen de l’humanité” and “a personal enemy of God.”

Mme L[oui]se Colet signed as <<L[oui]se Colet>>. Louise Colet (15 August 1810 – 9 March 1876), born Louise Revoil de Servannes, was a French poet and writer.

Émile de Saint-Amand Deschamps (20 February 1791 – 23 April 1871) was a French poet.

Mme Dufrenoy née Billet, sig as such; Adélaïde-Gillette Dufrénoy (née Billet) (1765–1825) was a French poet and painter from Brittany.

Jean-Antoine Gleizes (1773–1843) was a French writer and advocate of vegetarianism. He was extremely popular and influential at his time. His most famous work is Thalysie: the New Existence (1840, vol. 1; 1841, vol. 2; 1842, vol. 3).
Jean-François Marmontel (11 July 1723 – 31 December 1799) was a French historian and writer, a member of the Encyclopédistes movement.

Philippe François Nazaire Fabre d’Églantine (28 July 1750 – 5 April 1794), commonly known as Fabre d’Églantine was a French actor, dramatist, poet, and politician of the French Revolution. He was born in Carcassonne, Aude. His surname was Fabre, the d’Églantine being added in commemoration of his receiving a silver wild rose (French: églantine) from Clémence Isaure from the Academy of the Jeux Floraux at Toulouse.

Constance de Salm (Constance-Marie de Théis) (September 7, 1767 – April 13, 1845) was a French poet and miscellaneous writer.

Box and binding in red maroon cloth.