James Kendrew Ten Illustrated York Chap Books

$3,250.00

James Kendrew,  Ten Chapbooks bound. Book plate of Irwin Laughlin, whose motto was: Alias Aliis Hic Mihi, Ex-Bibliotheca in Aedibus Meridianis. Irwin B. Laughlin was an American diplomat, whose home in Washington, D. C., 1630 Crescent Place, now Meridan House, which once housed this book. Binding stamp partially illegible, Piccadilly.  A marvelous collection of early illustrated nineteenth century classic children’s stories in near fine condition. James Kendrew  (1803 – 1841) specialized in children’s chap books. In 1841, he was succeeded by his son, John Lofthouse Kendrew, who sold the business in 1848.

Description

James Kendrew,  Ten Chapbooks bound. Book plate of Irwin Laughlin, whose motto was: Alias Aliis Hic Mihi, Ex-Bibliotheca in Aedibus Meridianis. Irwin B. Laughlin was an American diplomat, whose home in Washington, D. C., 1630 Crescent Place, now Meridan House, which once housed this book. Binding stamp partially illegible, Piccadilly.  A marvelous collection of early illustrated nineteenth century classic children’s stories in near fine condition. James Kendrew  (1803 – 1841) specialized in children’s chap books. In 1841, he was succeeded by his son, John Lofthouse Kendrew, who sold the business in 1848. Gilt-trimmed tan calf, front hinge broken.

1.

The World Turned Upside Down, or, No News and Strange News. Decorated with Wood-Cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date].  31 pages, 29 woodcuts, wrapper is counted in the pagination. Percy Muir says, “By far the best version of ‘The World Turned Upside Down’ is that of the two sisters [Ann and Jane Taylor] published by Tabart in 1810, and illustrated by their brother Isaac.” The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.”  Fine.

2.

The Death and Burial of Cock Robin; to Which is Added, Pizarro and Alonzo; or, Industry better than Gold.  York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages, frontispiece (verso of title page), pp. 1-16 “Cock Robin”; pp. 17-29 “Pizarro and Alonzo”; “Industry better than Gold, pp. 29-31.  The date given on Cock Robin’s coffin on page 11 is “1805.” This comports with Osborne, p. 91, “An elegy on the death and burial of Cock Robin. Ornamented with cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew [ca. 1820]. Pp16. 9.5 cm x 6.5 cm. The woodcut on page 11 shows Cock Robin’s coffin inscribed with the date 1805.” The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.”  Fine.

3.

The Cries of York, for the Amusement of Good Children. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 30 pages, horizontal frontispiece on the verso of the wrapper front cover, 27 additional cuts, the last being of “The Comet, As seen at York, 1811,” above the alphabet given in upper, then lower case letters, with numbers 1 to [1]0. Osborne, p. 59, dates the chap book “1826?”, and he gives the title as “amusement of young children.” (Underlining not Osborne’s.) A popular subject for children’s literature, the balloon above the girl’s head holds “Fine Vacomb [Acomb?] sand,” in the large frontispiece. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.”   Fine.

4.

The Cries of London, for the Instruction and Amusement of Good Children. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages, frontispiece followed by a title page The Cries of London, for the Instruction and Amusement of Good Children. Illustrated with Woodcuts from Life. Roman letters, old English capital and small letters, and Italic capital and small letters are given on the verso of the title page. 23 cuts pp. 5 – 28; “The Dead Twins” follows on p. 29 – 31 with 2 additional woodcuts, the back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.” Osborne, Vol. 2, p. 629, describes his copy as having the woodcut appearing on p. 18, “My good soul, will you buy a Bowl?”, on the front cover, and printed on orange paper, also with “Rabbits! Rabbits!” on the cover, which appears on p. 21 in this copy, with the cry as, “Rabbit! Rabbit!’. Osborne dates this chapbook “ca. 1820.” Fine.

5.

[Lady Eleanor Frere Fenn 1743 – 1813] Mrs. Lovechild’s Golden Present, for All Good Little Boys and Girls. Decorated with Woodcuts. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. Osborne dates this chapbook  as “ca. 1820.” 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages. 31 woodcuts. There is a frontispiece on the verso of the front cover, followed by a title page replicating the front cover. On the verso of the title page is “A Card,” in which Mrs. Lovechild “… begs to lay before them a new introduction to letters, under the title of her Golden Present …” an illustrated abcedarium, pp. 5 – 16; followed by her explanation of letters, vowels, and syllables, pp. 19 – 23; the Lord’s Prayer follows on p. 24 with an anecdote and a woodcut on p. 25. “The Virtue of a Rod, or, the, History of a Naughty Boy” follows on pp. 26 – 31, illustrated with three woodcuts. The naughty boy lived in Baltimore County, Maryland. An American edition was advertised by Isaiah Thomas in 1786. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.” Osborne, Vol. 2, p. 721. Fine.

6.

The History of Whittington and His Cat; How from a poor Country Boy, destitute of Parents or Relations, He Attained Great Riches, And was promoted to the high and honorable dignity of Lord Mayor of London. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date, ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages. Frontispiece of Sir Richard Whittington on the verso of the front cover, followed by a title page, the verso of which is Roman capital and small letters above Italic capital and small letters. Eleven woodcuts, ten in the text; and, a moral for the story, “Reflection” on p. 29, followed by a six-stanza poem, “Against Lying.” The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.” Fine.

7.

A Visit to the Tower, Being An Account of Several Birds, and Beasts.

York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date, ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm. Two woodcut portraits in octagonal frames on the verso of the title page. Twelve woodcuts of animals, pp. 3-15. On the verso of p. 15 (unpaginated) are two woodcuts, one of a boy fishing and another of a man with what appear to be four babies’ baskets.

[William Wordsworth 1770 – 1850] Page 16 is also unpaginated, with Kendrew’s printing device above a half-title for  “Kendrew’s Edition of ‘We Are Seven.’ ” Second title, starts with new pagination Page 17 is page 1 and the frontispiece with Wordsworth’s quatrain, for The Little Maid and the Gentleman; or, We Are Seven. Embellished with Engravings. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, 23, Colliergate, [ca. 1820]. The verso of the title page is blank. There are twelve additional woodcuts above the verses, with another on the back cover, pp. 1 – 16. Page 16 is not numbered. Osborne, Vol. I, p. 87. Osborne says: “On cover: Kendrew’s Edition of We Are Seven. Some of the illustrations are Bewick woodcuts which appeared in A New Year’s gift and were also used to illustrate The Entertaining Story of Little Red Riding Hood (qq.v.). A chapbook edition of the poem was published in 1798. In a letter to Francis Wrangham, dated June 5, 1808, Wordsworth comments on the chapbook trade and adds: ‘I have so much felt the influence of these straggling papers that I have many a time wished that I had talents to produce songs, poems, and little histories that might circulate, among other good things in this way, supplanting partly the bad; flowers and useful herbs to take [the] place of weeds. Indeed some of the Poems which I have published were composed not without a hope, that at some time or other they might answer this purpose.”  Fine.

8.

The History of Tommy and Harry. Embellished with Engravings.

York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date]. Verso of front cover is two sailing ships, referring to p. 28. The verso of the title page with a woodcut of Harry, is blank. Six additional woodcuts in the text, with Roman capital and small letters and Italic capital and small letters above the numbers  1 to [1]0. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.” Fine. Osborne, Vol. I, p. 260.

9.

The Entertaining Story of Little Red Riding Hood, to Which Is Added, Tom Thumb’s Toy. Adorned with Cuts. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm. 31 pages. A penny chapbook in prose. Frontispiece on the verso of the front cover. Roman capital and small letters and Italic capital and small letters above the numbers  1 to [1]0 are on the back of the title page. Pages 1 – 17 have seven woodcuts illustrating Little Red Riding Hood. Little Tom Thumb’s Toy begins on page 18, with 3 woodcuts. A poem by Ann Taylor, “My Mother,” begins on page 29 and has one woodcut. The woodcuts in  Little Red Riding Hood are by Bewick, some of which appeared in A New Year’s gift and were also used to illustrate Wordsworth’s We Are Seven. (See above.) Osborne, Vol. I, p. 36.

10.

[Second Copy] The World Turned Upside Down, or, No News and Strange News. Decorated with Wood-Cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date]. 31 pages, 29 woodcuts, wrapper is counted in the pagination. Percy Muir says, “By far the best version of ‘The World Turned Upside Down’ is that of the two sisters [Ann and Jane Taylor] published by Tabart in 1810, and illustrated by their brother Isaac.” The back cover of the wrapper has a list of “Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew.”  Fine.