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John Gillane – Some Remarks Upon Sir James Dalrymple’s Historical Collections – 1714

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John Gillan’s Some Remarks Upon Sir James Dalrymple’s Historical Collections. 1714

Some Remarks Upon Sir James Dalrymple’s Historical Collections. With an Answer to the Vindication of the Ecclesiastical Part of Them. Where the Ancient Settlement of the Scots in Britain; Their Early Conversion to Christianity; The Government of their Church by Bishops; and Some of Their Ecclesiastical Rites and Customs, are Considered, and Cleared from the Mistakes of Several Learned Authors. Edinburgh: Printed. Sold by George Stewart, at the Book and Angel, 1714.

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Anonymous [Gillane, John]. Some Remarks Upon Sir James Dalrymple’s Historical Collections. With an Answer to the Vindication of the Ecclesiastical Part of Them. Where the Ancient Settlement of the Scots in Britain; Their Early Conversion to Christianity; The Government of their Church by Bishops; and Some of Their Ecclesiastical Rites and Customs, are Considered, and Cleared from the Mistakes of Several Learned Authors. Edinburgh: Printed. Sold by George Stewart, at the Book and Angel, 1714. 18cm, [ii; 162 pages]; 8vo; errata on verso of title-page; pp. 160-162 advertisements; pp. 161-161 repaired in this copy, minor text loss of a few advertisements. Bound in half blue goatskin over blue linen cloth, with gilt ruling and decorated spine, five raised bands, head and tail of spine bumped. ESTC Citation Number: T155366. Quotation from Phaedrus (IV, Fab. 25) on the title-page. A good, solid copy, not over-sewn.

John Gillan'

Published in the year of the Hanoverian accession to the throne of England, John Gillane makes a spirited defense of Presbyterianism: “But whether the ancient Scots were converted by the Disciples of St. John or St. Peter, by Doctors of the Eastern or Western Church, I am very confident they could dot [sic] have learn’d the Principles of our Scotish Presbyterians from either of them. No Church in the World was govern’d by a Parity of Church Officers. All the ancient Christians believ’d the Divine Institution of Episcopacy.”(IV, p. 40)Lowndes, 1857; I:183a.

John Gillan'