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James Russell Lowell’s Anti-War Poem Biglow Papers in Dialect with George Cruikshank’s Colored Illustrations

$500.00

James Russell Lowell (1819 – 1891) was one of the Fireside Poets, an American Romantic poet and diplomat to both Spain and the Court of St. James, a graduate of both Harvard College and Harvard Law School, as well as a professor of languages at Harvard and editor of The Atlantic Monthly. The Biglow Papers was later named by New York’s Grolier Club as the most important book of 1848. The book presented three main characters, each using dialects particular to three different walks of American life, thus comprising an opposition view of the Mexican-American War of 1848 and of war generally.

Description

Lowell, James Russell, The Choicest Poetry of the Age. The Biglow Papers: by James Russell Lowell. With Additional Notes, an Enlarged Glossary, and Coloured Engravings by George Cruikshank. Second English Edition. Eondon [sic]: John Camden Hotten, 1861. 17 cm. Second English edition, coloured plates by George Cruikshank. [frontispiece; xiv; 200 pages; viii (advertisements)] Original title-page reproduced with the publisher’s slip about Cruikshank’s frontispiece and plates (between viii and ix). Cohn 518. According to Cohn, “the second and best edition” with a colored frontispiece and two colored plates from the Comick Almanach, “Valor and Discretion” (1842) and “The Land Crab” (1846). Violet stamped cloth with a gilt design on spine and front cover. The plates occur at the frontispiece, pp. 42 and 126. “Notices of an Independent Press” pp. 190-200. Advertisement for this title is found on p. iv of concluding advertisements. Fine.

James Russell Lowell (1819 – 1891) was one of the Fireside Poets, an American Romantic poet and diplomat to both Spain and the Court of St. James, a graduate of both Harvard College and Harvard Law School, as well as a professor of languages at Harvard and editor of The Atlantic Monthly. The Biglow Papers was later named by New York’s Grolier Club as the most important book of 1848. The book presented three main characters, each using dialects particular to three different walks of American life, thus comprising an opposition view of the Mexican-American War of 1848 and of war generally.