A Funeral Sermon on Michael Morin 1770 Evans II 6146

$8,500.00

Evans (1941) Vol. 2, No. 6146, the 1748 printing at AAS; Bristol No. 1713, the 1755 Parker-Weyman printing at LC; Sabin P. 50705, the 1748 printing at LCP. This copy is from 1770, the fourth recorded copy, and likely a heretofore unknown and unrecorded printing by James Parker in New York.

Description

A FUNERAL SERMON ON MICHAEL MORIN, Master and Verger of the Church of Beausejour, in Champagne. Deceas’d the 1st of May, 1748. PREACHED By the Parson of the aforesaid Parish, before the Body of the Deceased, in Presence of the Parishioners. PRINTED IN THE YEAR 1770. 12mo. 16 pages. 12 cm x 9 ½ cm. Water-staining on pages 1 and 2, slight paper loss to the worn lower right-hand corner of page 1, now expertly restored. There is paper loss to page 15, affecting six lines of text: twelve words are lost, the paper loss has been expertly restored, without the addition of the missing words. There are no indications this piece was trimmed or ever bound. The wrapper put on by a nineteenth century institutional owner  survives in its conserved state. Stamp of National Bank of Commerce 1839 is on inside back cover of the bank’s wrapper.

Evans (1941) Vol. 2, No. 6146, the 1748 printing at AAS; Bristol No. 1713, the 1755 Parker-Weyman printing at LC; Sabin P. 50705, the 1748 printing at LCP. This copy is from 1770, the fourth recorded copy, and likely a heretofore unknown and unrecorded printing by James Parker in New York. A satiric parody of a funeral sermon (or eulogy), this title is more parable than parody, A FUNERAL SERMON ON MICHAEL MORIN is a short work of fiction meant to be read aloud and to arouse a sense of the patriotic in a native-born American reader and listener. The subtitle to this pseudo-sermon is: “OMNIS HOMO MORTALIS: WE ARE ALL MORTAL.” This aphorism, taking the place of the usual formally required Scriptural citation upon which any sermon of the period would have been built, provides the anonymous author a convenient device with which to drum home repeatedly a succession of translations or interpretations of OMNIS HOMO: “a man for everything,” “all Man,” “the Man for Everything,” and, finally in the mock peroration, “Every Man,” Michael Morin as Every Man, worthy of all the heroic deeds and attributes the author ascribes to him. Custom-made box by Deborah Evetts.

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Additional information

Author

Parker, James Parker

Title

A FUNERAL SERMON ON MICHAEL MORIN, Master and Verger of the Church of Beausejour, in Champagne. Deceas’d the 1st of May, 1748. PREACHED By the Parson of the aforesaid Parish, before the Body of the Deceased, in Presence of the Parishioners. PRINTED IN THE YEAR 1770.