G. Gosen Rare Books & Old Paper, Member ABAA / ILAB

SMALLPOX QUARANTINE IN THE “POCK HOUSE,” WRITTEN TO NICOLL HAVENS ON SHELTER  ISLAND, DECEMBER 1770.  WILLIAM NICOLL, JR. EXTOLS THE BENEFIT OF HIS  INOCULATION, HIS QUARANTINE WITH HIS WIFE AND FAMILY AND URGES HIS KINSMAN TO USE HIS HOME AS A VACCINATION CENTER.

First paragraph of an urgent letter by William Nicoll with news of a smallpox outbreak on Shelter Island and the quarantine measures taken to contain it, December 14, 1770, written from Islip, Long Island.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/william-nicoll-a…llpox-quarantine/ ‎

Ten Letters from Hannah Sylvester 1702 – 1720, a Shelter Island Heiress to Speaker of the New York Assembly and Royal Patent Holder, William Nicoll, Her Husband’s Executor.

Autograph letter written by Hannah Sylvester to the sitting General Assembly Speaker, William Nicoll (1657-1723),  in November 1709, insisting on her rightful share of her late husband’s estate.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/ten-letters-1702…r-island-heiress/ ‎

Brigade Major Thomas Fosdick, Aide-de-Camp for Brig. Gen. John Glover, Autograph Letter Signed twice, April 27, 1775, ink on paper, written in great haste to his  brother-in-law, Nicoll Havens, Esq., from New London, April 27, 1775,  referencing the  British attack at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts on April 19, 1775, “the shot heard around the world,” that began the American Revolutionary War. Taken from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Concord Hymn, first verse:

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world.”

Letter of Thomas Fosdick to his brother-in-law, April 27, 1775, written on week after “the shot heard round the world” was fired at Lexington, Massachusetts.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/thomas-fosdick-letter-april-27-1775-start-of-revolutionary-war/

Cornelius Sleight II (1853 – 1881), Manuscript book titled, Notes On A Course of Lectures on Elementary Law. Delivered by Professor Robinson to the Students of the Yale Law School. 86 pages. The lectures date from September 11, 1874 to November 20, 1874.

The first page of lecture notes for the first lecture, which started with Blackstone’s definition.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/yale-law-school-1874-manuscript-notebook-for-twenty-william-robinson-lectures-by-cornelius-sleight/

Anna F[rances] Sleight, (1853 – ?) Daughter of Anna Charlotte Dering Sleight.  November 30, 1878, a journal of 50 pages, pencil on paper, paper-bound tablet in good condition, written in portrait orientation, with two pages additional listing the passengers, kept aboard the steamers Acapulco and Granada.

Anna Frances Sleight’s entry recording her approach to San Francisco and the Golden Gate.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/twenty-sketches-of-shelter-and-block-islands-1887-1889-by-anna-frances-sleight/

 

 

Abigail (Chesebrough) Grant 1734-1807, ALS, 4 pages, March 6, 1774, from London, damp-stained, with tears, comparing moral temptations in London to those where her correspondent is, remarking on the life of a pious soul and the temptations that test it.

Signature, date and place of writing, London, of an autograph letter of Abigail Grant, March 6, 1774.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/abigail-chesebrough-grant-autograph-letter-march-1774-london-theatre-and-court/

[Anna F. Sleight] A Drawing Book, 27 cm x 21 cm, containing 20 sketches, inner-lined in a book with 22 leaves, all graphite except one pastel study.

Untitled and undated graphite sketch of a windmill.https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/twenty-sketches-of-shelter-and-block-islands-1887-1889-by-anna-frances-sleight/

Andrew Oliver (1706-1774), ALS, July 13, 1738, to Brinley Sylvester from Boston, to his uncle by marriage.

Signature of Andrew Oliver, the official tasked with enforcing the hated Stamp Act.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/andrew-oliver-autograph-letter-signed-july-13-1738/

Mary Sylvester, ALS, December 8, 1737, wife of Brinley Sylvester, later treated by Dr. John Smith in Rye for mental illness, written from Shelter Island to her daughter Margaret in Boston. She fears the smallpox and believes it is God’s punishment on people who provoke Him daily.

An autograph letter from Mary Sylvester to her daughter in which she describes her fear of smallpox, the news of an earthquake and the fear shown by her slaves, December 8, 1737.

https://www.gosenrarebooks.com/book/mary-sylvester-autograph-letter-smallpox-earthquake-and-slaves-december-8-1737/